eBook Playing Loteria / El juego de la loteria By Rene Colato Lainez – Papercuts.co

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10 thoughts on “Playing Loteria / El juego de la loteria

  1. says:

    I absolutely love this bilingual (Spanish/English) story! Not only does it teach others about a beloved game my siblings, cousins, and I all played together when we were young--la otería--but it also teaches children to spend time with their loved ones, even if they don't speak each other's language very well: "Loved ones have special ways of understanding each other..." (p. 1).

    In this story, a little boy is nervous about visiting his grandmother who lives in Mexico (San Luis de la Paz, Guanajuato) on his own because he mostly speaks English and his grandmother only speaks Spanish. By practicing the riddles that go with each lotería card, the little boy and his abuela spend time together and his Spanish improves. He even teaches Abuela a little English. By the end of his trip, the boy wants to spend more time with his grandma. It is just such a special story--one that celebrates bilingualism and biculturalism and encourages "mostly English" speakers to spend time with Spanish-speaking family members.


  2. says:

    This book highlights a situation that many children have in their families - a grandparent with a different primary language. The boy's mother encourages him to spend time with his grandmother in spite of a language barrier.

    During his time with abuelita, the boy learns more Spanish and teaches her more English. They bond at the fair and with the game Loteria. Loteria is much like Bingo. It would be fun to read this and then play Loteria together.

    This is a sweet story with much to offer readers about relationships, language, and bravely trying new things.


  3. says:

    El Juego de la Loteria is a bilingual book appropriate for more experienced readers (probably around third or fourth grade). The literary content is somewhat thick for a children's book, but is overall an easy read with accessible, commonly used vocabulary. The illustrations are gorgeous and expressive, and were clearly painted with great care. This book is fiction, but based on real cultural practices.

    The story is brief. It follows a young Latino boy who grew up in America and has lost touch with his family's cultural roots. He visits his abuela in Mexico for summer vacation, in the city of San Luis de la Paz, during a seasonal fair. His grandmother mostly speaks Spanish, and he is "not used to speaking Spanish" and is instead used to speaking English.

    The main character's difficulty with Spanish is an essential aspect of this story. He wants to learn Spanish (particularly all the phrases on the lottery cards) to better understand his grandmother, so they strike a deal: she'll teach him all of the Spanish words on the cards, and he'll teach her English.

    Overall, this story is great. It's easy enough to read for little ones, and the illustrations serve to make life in Mexico really fun and enriching. The fun fair seems like an absolute blast, and the food looks and sounds utterly scrumptious. The dynamic duo in the story are very endearing, and seeing them overcome their language barrier with the power of family is a high-impact message.

    It's fully bilingual. The entire story (and the instructions to play the lottery, in the back of the book) are written in both English and Spanish - and both translations include words from the other language. For developing bilingual learners, it's a perfect choice for a wholesome story about family and discovering one's cultural roots. I think it would serve to impart upon young Latinx children the value of family and origin. It would even be appropriate for read-alouds for younger children, albeit they may need an above-average attention span!

    The problem of language barriers is not directly discussed, but could easily lead to questions from readers/listeners. The resolution is predictable, but cute. The characters are believable, and the age-appropriate text is supporting by the illustrations. The author is an immigrant from El Salvador; the illustrator is an American, but has clearly taken influence from South/Central American artists.

    My main qualm is that I would argue the represented lifestyles are not extremely nuanced. Abuela doesn't do much besides eat and have fun, and secondary characters are not investigated in length. However, the positive aspects of Mexican culture are examined pretty thoroughly for a children's book of this targeted age-range. I'd consider this a must-have for bilingual learners and the children of immigrants who may have not been very exposed to their family's extended cultural values.


  4. says:

    Lainez, R. C. (2005). Playing Loteria / El Juego de La Loteria (Bilingual): El Juego de La Loteria . Flagstaff: Luna Rising.

    Subgroup: Family and Community

    Genre: Fiction

    How it relates to the Latino cultural: This book illustrates the beautiful relationship between grandmother and grandson. There is a strong bond between family.

    Synopsis: As a little boy gets dropped off at his grandmother’s house, he is worried that they will not be able to communicate with each other because of a language barrier. He speaks English and a little Spanish and his grandmother only speaks Spanish. He is excited to discover that his grandmother has a Loteria stand at the fair. The little boy learns to speak Spanish a little better with his Grandmother’s help and he comes to find out that “loved ones have special ways of understanding each other”.


  5. says:

    This book, told in first person from the boy's point of view, is about the relationship between a grandmother who speaks little English and her grandson who speaks little Spanish and the game of Loteria (similar to Bingo), which is widely played in Mexico. The boy is sent to spend time with his grandmother to learn Spanish, but the boy ends up teaching his grandmother English as well.

    Recommend this book to readers in kindergarten and up. This is a great teaching tool; it explains what all the cards mean and has instructions on how to play loteria in the back of the book. So, recommend this to teachers looking for good books on Mexican culture. Also recommend What Can you do with a Rebozo and What can you do with a Paleta, both by Carmen Tafolla.


  6. says:

    In the changing landscape within immigrant and first generation families, many children speak only English with vague knowledge of the native tongue of their grandparents/parents. Lainez uses the popular traditional card game of loteria, which is perfect for learning Spanish vocabulary, to bring a young boy closer to his culture, his grandmother, and her language. This is an important representation of a newer group of Latino children - American citizens whose first and often times only language is English, with one foot in the U.S.A. and one in the land of their heritage.

    Suggest to those looking for bilingual picture books, patrons with an interest in traditional Mexican pop culture, those looking for a broader representation of Latino children in literature for young people.


  7. says:

    In the changing landscape within immigrant and first generation families, many children speak only English with vague knowledge of the native tongue of their grandparents/parents. Lainez uses the popular traditional card game of loteria, which is perfect for learning Spanish vocabulary, to bring a young boy closer to his culture, his grandmother, and her language. This is an important representation of a newer group of Latino children - American citizens whose first and often times only language is English, with one foot in the U.S.A. and one in the land of their heritage.

    Suggest to those looking for bilingual picture books, patrons with an interest in traditional Mexican pop culture, those looking for a broader representation of Latino children in literature for young people


  8. says:

    We liked this book but we loooove playing loteria.


  9. says:

    This game has been around in the Mexican culture for over 200 years. A little boy goes to visit his grandmother in Mexico. He is a bit scared because he doesn’t speak Spanish and his grandmother doesn’t speak English. When he arrives in Mexico he finds out that there is a fair in town and his grandmother has a booth at the fair. She is hosting the game of loteria for a few days at the fair. The little boy hangs out with his grandmother at the fair and learns new some Spanish words from the game and he even teaches his grandmother a few English words too. He ends up having a great time and is looking forward to visit her again the following summer.


  10. says:

    I teach in a bilingual setting where a great percentage of the population has Mexican roots so this story gets them fired up. It's about a grandson going to spend some time with Grandma to practice his Spanish, you can imagine how thrilled he was about it. The Loteria is their connecting point and Grandma has a "Loteria" booth at the fair. Many of my students enjoy writing about their visits to the TX State Fair and to theme parks but they have a hard time making an engaging narrative about these experiences. This book is a great mentor text to explore how to write an interesting story about your visit to places like these.