Один день Ивана Денисовича eBook – Papercuts.co

The Only English Translation Authorized By Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn First Published In The Soviet Journal Novy Mir In , One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovich Stands As A Classic Of Contemporary Literature The Story Of Labor Camp Inmate Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, It Graphically Describes His Struggle To Maintain His Dignity In The Face Of Communist Oppression An Unforgettable Portrait Of The Entire World Of Stalin S Forced Work Camps, One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovich Is One Of The Most Extraordinary Literary Documents To Have Emerged From The Soviet Union And Confirms Solzhenitsyn S Stature As A Literary Genius Whose Talent Matches That Of Dosotevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy Harrison SalisburyThis Unexpurgated Translation By H T Willetts Is The Only Authorized Edition Available, And Fully Captures The Power And Beauty Of The Original Russian


10 thoughts on “Один день Ивана Денисовича

  1. says:

    Dear Mr Solzhenitsyn,I am not a Russian scholar, not even in the armchair variety But you have done something magical in ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISOVICH that eclipsed this reader s ignorance you have transmuted what it was like to live a life day in and day out in much the same fashion Think about it Morning, the same as yesterday Afternoon the same as yesterday s afternoon The night yep, the same And this made me yearn for a day when Ivan would awaken and see that it would be different This ability to create which you lived for a time a life of perpetual recycling was heartbreaking, and so real that it made me think of not only Russian dissidents political or otherwise , but of all the people incarcerated now in prisons, relationships marriages, dating , loneliness, jobs, or, to a certain degree, aimless lives To think that every morning is going to be bleak when one awaits sleep, mortified and numbed and haunted my thoughts as I read this novel Add in the fact that Ivan never knew if time was going to be added on his sentence or if he was going to die in this desolate gulag, I had a real hard time distancing myself from this character I live a very happy life I have a wife I love and adore and two beautiful children, a house, a career at times I would trade this , always a full stomach, clothes, cable, thousands of books, and countless friends But even with all these pleasures, the thought of being isolated in a world were insubordination was met with violence or, worse, disappearance, became my mental reality, trapping me in this world that you created Dark thoughts permeated throughout my mind like a giant shark searching for prey and ate my happiness Rarely has such a deft, short novel made such an emotional impact on me.This, sir, is why you are one of my favorite authors VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED


  2. says:

    Some Nobel Prizes in Literature resulted in trouble than glory for the laureates Little did it matter to Harry Martinson that his genius epic poem Aniara An Epic Science Fiction Poem spoke for his worthiness as a Nobel Laureate, the bad press that followed the announcement ruined his mental health.In the case of Solzhenitsyn, the attention he received internationally after the award quite literally threatened his physical well being and his ability to live and write in the country he considered his home, despite its oppression and cruelty.His most well known work, describing one single day in the life of an inmate in a Soviet Gulag, quite miraculously was approved for publication in the Soviet Union in 1962, and played a major role in the decision to award Solzhenitsyn the Nobel Prize in 1970.As a harrowing, cold, sharp witness account of the suffering of Gulag prisoners, it is a document of universal importance It does for Soviet history what All Quiet on the Western Front does for the history of World War I, depicting the experience of one protagonist in a sharp realism that makes the reader shudder I felt cold, I felt hungry, I felt scared, I felt harassed, I felt helpless, I felt hopeless, I felt powerless, I felt humiliated Every single emotion described in the book immediately transferred to me, and made me live through this one particular day in the gulag Very much like the soldier in All Quiet on the Western Front, the prisoner does not have time to be worrying about the political system that placed him in his living hell His sole focus must be to get through the day, and then wake up the next morning and face it again, constantly fighting the biological needs of his body The repetition of the suffering is the hellish part of the story, made crystal clear in the heartbreaking final sentence The end of an unclouded day Almost a happy one Just one of the 3,653 days of his sentence, from bell to bell The extra three were for leap years For the reader, suffering through the ONE SINGLE DAY in a reading chair, with a cup of hot tea and shortbread and a warm blanket, was hard The unimaginable reality of the real prisoners is summed up in the accurate account of how many of those days they LIVED through, not forgetting the three extras for leap years Imagine reading this story 3,653 times And it would still be much comfortable than living it And don t forget that you only have to deal with one of the unclouded, almost happy days And you don t have to die in the end, after years of suffering, like the hero of All Quiet on the Western Front, who lived through the trench warfare reality only to die in October 1918, a completely unimportant, random detail in the big schemes of things One day in one life, but there were so many days,and so many lives Solzhenitsyn received the Nobel Prize for the ethical force with which he has pursued the indispensable traditions of Russian literature This was already perfectly outlined in One Day , and then shown in a magnificent parable in the Cancer Ward, where different individuals from a variety of political and social backgrounds find themselves with a disease that destroys them from within, and there is nothing they can do to prevent it from happening The gulag was one symptom of the symbolical illness that spread in the Soviet Union A must read for people interested in the connection between literature and history Put on a warm jacket, though, it is going to be freezing cold


  3. says:

    it s all about perspective yeah, ivan denisovich shukov is in a soviet labor camp, where he is freezing and has to work at bullshit tasks and is being punished for something he didn t even get to do because being a spy is cool, while being punished for being a spy when you didn t even get to have the fun of being a spy is lame , and it s all terrible with no end in sight, but come on.he got to sleep late his punishment for oversleeping is he had to wash some floors indoors instead of working out in the russian subzero nightmare he got extra food time and time again,he didn t get caught with his secret contraband, he networked and got some karma for future favors in his karma bank, he got some smokes and was recognized for his hard work, and he had a fever, which had to be good for keeping him a little warmer than those people who didn t have fevers pretty good day all around.me, i am not in a russian gulag, but i didn t get to sleep late it is nearly 7 pm and i have not had any food today, nor any cigarettes, i have not been praised for my hard work, even though i did indeed work very very hard today you try keeping your composure when someone yells hey at you from across the floor and with no preamble thrusts his sweaty cell phone at you so you can talk to his friend who wants books about russian icons, but doesn t have any titles, but commands you to just type it in and he will memorize the list this man has very optimistic ideas about the search capabilities of the computers at barnes and noble after work i had to go to staples because my power strip exploded, then to the hardware store and the organic market, even though all i wanted to do was go home to have the pleasure of working on my ALA presentation for the rest of my friday night i did not network i have no future karmic payload coming as for the contraband well, that s my little secret.still and all i feel like karen brissetova s day was exhausting and less rewarding overall.and i don t even get to see any snow.snow, sausage, and cigarettes sound pretty good to me, man.come to my blog


  4. says:

    I want to appreciate life the way Ivan Denisovich Shukov does.I want to take pride in my work I want to taste every bite of sausage, suck the marrow out of every fish bone, enjoy every puff of every cigarette, bask in a sunset, watch the moon cross the sky, fall asleep content I want to focus on the necessities of living I want to focus on life, but I have too much It s not much compared to most everyone I know, but it is still too much And because it is too much I can t appreciate life the way Ivan Denisovich Shukov does Reading about it is not enough, but right now it is what I have.I ll keep trying.


  5. says:

    1995 _ 4 .


  6. says:

    Odin den Ivana Denisovicha One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, Aleksandr SolzhenitsynOne Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, is a novel by Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first published in November 1962 in the Soviet literary magazine Novy Mir New World The story is set in a Soviet labor camp in the 1950s and describes a single day in the life of ordinary prisoner, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov 1972 1343 166 20 1350 236 1363 230 1388 191 9789645589460 1394 206 9789642092208 1390 177 9786001820526 1962


  7. says:

    Moral of this Tale No matter your socioeconomic position in life, or the degree of happiness in it, hard WORK is just the thing to let the hours sift on by.The book that caused such a general sensation back then is but a significant albeit very tiny beep on the literature radar now The smallness made big by elegant overexpressive prose is a sight to behold, but not, alas, a true wonder to read.


  8. says:

    1970 1941


  9. says:

    467 T l charger des photoscertificity.com


  10. says:

    Ivan Denisovich Shukhov was sentenced to ten years of labor camp for treason against the fatherland In reality, he was simply taken prisoner by the Germans during the Second World War before he managed to escape, thinking, naively, that he would be welcomed with open arms on his return Although he has already done most of his time, he knows full well that it will be extended again and again, and that he will probably only come out of the camp with his feet in front.Shukhov nevertheless supports each day with a resignation approved by the stoics of antiquity All the little tricks are good to improve a little its existence do not eat all your loaf of bread in the morning to make it last and have the illusion of having larger rations to render small services to those who can receive parcels to receive something in return muddle the cook s accounts to get a share of extra soup hide the best trowel on the job site to make sure you keep it every day From the first pages, we identify with Shukhov we feel the biting cold trying to make its way to him, his hollow in the stomach, we share his fear that the piece of bread he has hidden is stolen during his absence, we tremble that another prisoner does not betray him to gain a small advantage.A powerful work, which makes us understand through a minimalist testimony all the back of the scenery a totalitarian system that denies the individual, removes all hope and opportunity to return to normal life.